Mar 24 2010

Was the 26/11 terrorist attack in Mumbai, ‘India’s 9/11′ ?

When India was attacked on 26th November 2008, news anchors and journalists started calling it ‘India’s 9/11.’ This film examines this terminology and the links between 9/11, 26/11 in Mumbai, Iraq, Afghanistan and Modern terror. The conversations between taxi drivers and their passengers in Mumbai taxis delve into these larger issues. A tragic terrorist attack, a lapse in security, the loss of the top Anti Terrorist Squad officials who were investigating the so called ‘Hindu terrorist’ attacks in Malegao lead the people to voice their notions of larger conspiracy theories at a time when the Mainstream media mentions none of this. These are not authoritative voices but perspectives like yours and mine on the events which affect and shape our lives. They are short takes, 140 characters long tweets in taxis, between real people riding in a taxi, in a city that experienced extreme violence, terror and loss.

The current poll on The Taxi Takes has a majority of 50% who say it should not be termed India’s 9/11 and 34% in favor of the Mumbai attacks being termed ‘India’s 9/11. However there are also a small 8 % who are not sure which hence makes this a rather balanced undecided poll.

Watch the film and cast your vote. But more importantly I urge you to listen to the common voices on the streets of the Mumbai Metropolis and gather a sense of where the Mumbai terrorist attack of might figure in the larger scheme of current happenings in the world. Please give your take and comments below.

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2 Responses to “Was the 26/11 terrorist attack in Mumbai, ‘India’s 9/11′ ?”

  • Watch Hindi Movies Says:

    nice blog post about this subject. this makes me ask a question though, so i dont really understand the relation of this topic and your entire blog. it just doesnt go together. But nontheless i found it very readable. Cheers, Rizwan

  • Vida Streeby Says:

    Well, that is my first take a look at to your blog! We are a group of volunteers and starting a brand new initiative in a regional community in the exact same niche. Your blog supplied us valuable information to work on. You’ve done a marvellous job!

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Mar 4 2010

Anti Terrorism Fatwa

Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri

Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri, a former Pakistani lawmaker issued an anti terrorism fatwa in London this Tuesday. It stated that suicide bombing was banned by Islam “without any excuses, any pretexts, or exceptions.” This is a great stand and one that many other organizations have taken before. Even recently after the incident at Fort Hood, The National Coalition of South Asian Organizations released ‘their fatwa.’ The NCSO consists of over twenty organizations who had issued this strong statement after the tragedy in Fort Hood. It is not any different from most of the voices I heard in the Mumbai taxis. Christians, Muslims, Hindus, Parsis and Jews traveling through bustling Bombay commented on this unfortunate misconception between Islam and Terror and voiced the same concern as Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri and The Quilliam Foundation.

When will mainstream media truly pay attention to all the voices of dissent? Like I said , a great stand but one which has been stated by the common man for decades. May this fatwa enter the domain of pop culture and be talked about on twitter, blogs, backyards in Alabama, streets of Kabul, Mc Donalds kitchens and headlines of every big publication Worldwide as much as it was talked about in the Mumbai taxis. Inshallah!

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2 Responses to “Anti Terrorism Fatwa”

  • Bipin Says:

    It is welcome move to issue such fatwa that suicide bombing was banned by Islam without any excuses, any pretexts, or exceptions. Suicide is always condemnable by almost all the religions and nothing new in it. So, it can be counted as a teaching statement rather than issuing fatwa. Similarly, Islamic group has even earlier issued fatwa against any kind of violence/terrorism in general. But, what today need is fatwa against terrorists or terrorists group specifically to pressurize them to stop terrorism. When you can give fatwa against Taslima Nasreen and Salman Rashdie specifically then why not issue fatwa against any terrorist specifically. This is what required in today’s time. Can any of Islamic group dare to do this? It will be welcome.

  • trivedi Says:

    good point raised keep it up

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Feb 13 2010

Pune Terror Blast @German Bakery

I woke up this morning to a text message, ” Terrorist attack in Pune just now! Bombay on high alert.” Later I checked Facebook expecting to see more news scribbled all across people’s walls.I found only a few. The attack wasn’t big and spectacular enough to capture our imagination and interest for long I guess. There was no plane flying into any tall building, no posh World heritage site under seige or even hostages. Instead what caused the attack was a small package maybe like the one displayed by the MTA in New York under the sign,’ If you See Something, Say Something’, probably a brown box tied up in string. Who knows. A well meaning waiter probably trying to do his job, touched the package and today was his last day working at the German Bakery. As of now 9 people have been reported killed and 45 injured.

A lot of talk is going on about if this is a terrorist attack or not. India has witnessed years of ‘bombs being left in packages’ type of blasts. Back then they were not termed terror attacks, just a bomb blast. Now with talks between India and Pakistan scheduled for February 25th 2010, authorities are trying to get more evidence and different departments are scrambling from New Delhi to get paper work going and official press releases prepared.

But at this time I think of the German Bakery. As an engineering student in Pune my brother used to live in Koregaon Park, 5 minutes away from German Bakery. I went there when the wooden seats and tables were literally on the road itself and the only thing that divided the open road from the sweet bakery was a bamboo like fence and a makeshift roof which sheltered us from the scorching sun. With growing popularity the owners decided to put up a bamboo wall and paint it green in keeping with all the healthy snacks and drinks they sold. A Bamboo wall is a bit like a sky roof. Nothing very imposing and barricading about it. A soft target with zenned out folks from the Osho Ashram with musical instruments and granola bars, tie and dye skirts and wooden beads. The Bamboo wall splintered into smithereens when the package went off today. Many people have lost their lives and many more have lost brothers, sisters, hope, maybe a livelihood, maybe a dream of coming to India on a spiritual journey……who knows.

If the German Bakery ever re-opens it will never have a bamboo fence again but probably a big metal door and many security guards. Bags might be searched and forget about taking a guitar inside to sing and strum. A story similar to the warm and lively Leopold Cafe in Bombay that was targeted. Terror strikes to induce cold hostility and calculated caution. Maybe that’s why India is getting hit again and again. Someone wants the ever welcoming hospitality to cow down and put up its big metal walls. But I hope it never does. Who knows.

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4 Responses to “Pune Terror Blast @German Bakery”

  • Prajakta Says:

    I distinctly remember my college days being spent on those benches waiting in the sun on the bamboo fence – What is this world coming to? I still cannot believe it German bakery will not exist anymore – If I was in Pune on A saturday night 7pm – I’d probably be nearby there..

  • Vineet Jawa Says:

    It’s terrible. German Bakery is to Pune that Leopold’s to Mumbai. Terrorists headed to tier 2 cities – where does it end?

  • siddharth sood Says:

    i remember countless moments spent in the German Bakery over a span of 8 years that i lived in Pune. TO those of us who have lived in Pune the German Bakery was much much more then just a bakery / coffee shop. It represented a peek into a fascinating world / life that a lot of us imagined. It gave us our first sample of cappuccinos much before the baristas and coffee days. Pune will just not be the same without it.

  • Scott Ryan Says:

    Is this Sid who I met at Aviram’s appartment in November 09?

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Jan 19 2010

The Taxi Takes is traveling.It’s on ‘News India Times’ now.

‘The Taxi Takes’ traveled to Trinidad and Tobago recently. I had a screening there for some Trinidadians and even ‘Trini’ Indians with the help of multimedia artist Elspeth Duncan. There was another impromptu screening in Brooklyn thanks to Nicole Jaquis whose project Ascetics with Camera will be traveling to the Kumbh Mela in India this year also.

Kavita Ramdya, author of Bollywood Weddings and journalist at News India Times recently interviewed me and has written an article about ‘The Taxi Takes.‘ Feel free to read it on her site or download the pdf from my press page.  A small piece of misinformation is that I was born in New Delhi and not Mumbai. I am pleased that the core concept of having a dialogue in public spaces – taxi cabs and now the Internet is taking place in this manner!

This website will be undergoing some over hauls and is also planning larger screenings in the near future. The media press kit will be available online for download shortly. I am looking into having a screening at a public venue  in NYC for New York taxi drivers of Indian and Pakistani orign. Watch this space for more details!

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Nov 11 2009

Newsweek Video- Terror Dominates the first decade of the 21st Century

Newsweek has done a great job at condensing the news and events of this past decade into a short 7 minute film.

Of course US news and its elections take center stage but pertinently enough Terrorism seems to have dominated this decade in more ways then one. Ofcourse some direct associations can be made with each American President and the corresponding World Wars and events also. Ironically Madonna and Britney Spear’s kiss hogs more screen time than the 26/11 terrorist attacks in Mumbai. A foreboding and predictive way in which the media is already heading towards titillation rather than truthful fact informing. If NDTV made this, would they give Rakhi Sawant’s ‘swayamvar’ more time than the Naxalite problem? Probably yes I say.

The Fort Hood attack and it’s coverage in the US is a scary example of stereo typing and even ignorant reporting. More to come on that.
So will the next ten years have a corresponding increase in headlines on Terror? What’s your prediction?

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Oct 20 2009

More about Mumbai

It’s important to understand Mumbai and what it’s all about. Recently a fantastic fifty reasons were penned down by Kanika Parab & Mansi Poddar on CNNGo about why Mumbai should be considered the greatest city in the World. The list includes six features which play a relevant role in ‘The Taxi Takes on Terror.’

So at number three there is the Famous Ladies Specials which even got press in the New York Times article I posted. Yes it’s good for Indian women to have a hassle free commute.Though I think woman, all around the World have commuting stories of alarm and horror that they could share.

Leopold Cafe, and it’s distinctive charm and toughness is at number 24. I know that people still throng this bar and the 26/11 attack didn’t make any dent in it’s popularity. In fact more people probably go to see the bullet holes and shattered glass now more than ever.

And at number three we have the taxis! The ‘kalee peelee’ or black and yellow cabs which are fun and noisy, old and sacred, tarnished and decorated, sturdy and yet unfortunately slowly leaving the landscape of the city. The Government has passed a law that forbids taxis that are older than 25 years to stay on the streets. So the iconic Fiat taxis are being replaced by zippier Omnis, Santros and Marutis. But you’ll get to see a lot of these soon to be vintage classics on The Taxi Takes. So stay glued:)

The ‘dhobhi ghats’ of Bombay are a historic place where the laundry of Bombay comes to be washed at row upon rows of stone wash pens. A ‘dhobhi’ is a washerman and nearly two hundred ‘dhobhis’ will wash clothes together at any given time. I met two of these ‘dhobhis’ who have been washing clothes in Bombay as part of a profession that has been passed on to them by their grand fathers. At one point when the taxi driver and two washermen were talking in the taxi, I chuckled to myself thinking I really had an incredible slice of the working class! So at number 37 we have the Dhobhi ghats.

Haji Ali , the miraculous floating Dargah comes in at number 43. Built in 1431 by Sayed Peer Haji Ali Shah Bukhari, a rich Muslim merchant it is one of the most recognizable structures off the coast of Southern Mumbai. I have some wonderful footage of the taxi driver Jamid Ali standing near the mosque , by the water’s edge as the sun was setting behind him. He sang a song he had written in dedication to his mother, who died when he was nine. I’ll put a clip of him on his profile page eventually.

The last reason was because there were so many holidays in Mumbai. Due to it’s multi cultural, multi ethnic and secular nature India houses every religion in the World. So at any given time of the year Indians can expect to have a holiday celebrating either a Christian, Hindu, Muslim, Jewish, Parsi, Buddhist, Sikh or Jain tradition.

The other reasons are also fun, brilliant and definitely worth a read for anyone who has heard of Mumbai but never been there. A great city in a wonderful country. More on Mumbai later.

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Oct 2 2009

Blessings to the Women Taxi Drivers from Mahatma Gandhi on his 140th Birthday.

Today, October 2nd 2009 is the hundred and fortieth birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi. Today I will place a flower at the feet of his wonderful statue that stands at Union Square in New York City. His legacy and life will influence the World forever. I have always been in awe of him.
Another fact which always astounded me was that at the same time in history there lived a man who managed to compel masses of people towards non violence while another being provoked them towards genocide. Mahatma Gandhi and Hitler were contemporaries. Imagine a movie with a split screen showing the peace and self will involved in non violence (ahimsa) alongside the holocaust, simultaneously in India and Germany. A horrific image that makes my heart beat faster. I wonder what it is that can drive one human being towards peace and humanity and another towards the extreme opposite? But then again, why must I look back in time with a sense of disgust and horror when the World around me still hasn’t yet blown out those demonic fires of terror and violence.

In 1950, the great Jewish physicist, Albert Einstein, a genius and noble being in his own right recorded an interview in his study in Princeton, New Jersey. In this United Nations radio interview he said about Mahatma Gandhi, “Generations to come, it may well be, will scarce believe that such a man as this one ever in flesh and blood walked upon this Earth. ”

These words ring like a loud Buddhist temple gong reverberating into the air for minutes. These are my favorite words about Gandhiji. They are inscribed in stone at the Gandhi museum in New Delhi. They came to my mind when I spoke to taxi drivers in Bombay. I had earlier thought of calling my project, ‘If Gandhi were a filmmaker.’ I wondered what his insights and documentary recordings would be while driving around the country. What would he make out of this fine Nation of ours that he had strived so hard to keep from partitioning into Pakistan and Hindustan.

Mumbai Taxi drivers said that if the great man had existed in today’s day and age, no one would give him the time of day. Materialistic, superficial people would laugh at his ascetic lifestyle and flimsy loin cloth and no one would heed his call to non violence and ‘satyagraha.’
Taxi drivers cursed the current politicians and literally spit on them as they were driving around. They spoke of how not one politician had it in them to lead a country to Independence from 200 years of British colonialism like Gandhiji yet alone help us get out of the shackles of terrorism that India is facing now. In fact it is the people in power, they said, who have brought on these acts of terror and violence for the common Indian citizen.

I know that Mahatma Gandhi, may his ‘great soul’ rest in peace was a great champion of women’s rights and empowerment. In 1940, reviewing his twenty-five years of work in India concerning women’s role in society, he had said:
“My contribution to the great problem lies in my presenting for acceptance truth and ahimsa (non-violence) in every walk of life, whether for individuals or nations. I have hugged the hope that in this women will be the unquestioned leader and, having thus found her place in human evolution, will shed her inferiority complex.”
“…Woman is the incarnation of ahimsa. Ahimsa means infinite love, which again means infinite capacity for suffering. And who but woman, the mother of man, shows this capacity in the largest measure?… Let her translate that love to the whole of humanity… And she will occupy her proud position by the side of man… She can become the leader in satyagraha..”

I know he would find great solace in the young breed of women taxi drivers who can be seen on the streets of Mumbai nowadays.

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Sep 16 2009

Make Way for Women in Trains and Taxis.

My first text message for today was from my friend Alci telling me about a cover story in today’s New York Times. Something about Indian women and women only compartments in trains. “Indian Women find New Peace in Rail Commute” talks about how the Indian Government has started ‘women only’ compartments in trains in the big urban cities of New Delhi, Mumbai, Calcutta and Chennai as a way of providing more safety to larger numbers of working women who have entered the work force in a country that is patriarchal and gender dictated in many ways.


Now I know that ‘Ladies Specials’ as they are also called have existed for a while in Mumbai local trains and some seats are even reserved for ladies in buses in different cities. When I was in Bombay I would travel by the general compartment, only if I had a male friend along and even then I got glares and stares my way. The one exception was one late night after filming when I got on and started taking pictures with my camera. I ended up making friends with two mothers and their children on their way back from a wedding which is a separate incident all together.

So to be perfectly honest this cover story on the New York Times front page comes as a surprise to me. Yes I admit that many westerners might find this story shocking and news worthy in many ways. Being victimized and asserting their rights is an issue that Indian women face on a daily basis thanks to a legacy which consists of traditions like ‘sati‘, where women would burn themselves along with their dead husbands on the funeral pyre, female infanticide and foeticide, notions of purity and pollution from the caste system that lead to maternity deaths, dowry and even dowry deaths. The fact that Indian women are empowering themselves, becoming financially independent and standing on their own two feet to get to work and earn for their family is a step that is in effect a giant leap across decades of norms and traditions. So yes I think it’s a positive step to ensure ladies have a safe commute to their workplace.
And why not?! It’s what the New York City MTA is trying to enforce through their new anti harassment ad campaign that I saw the other day in the subway. Enough ladies in New York have a hard time in public spaces and this too in a country that championed female empowerment and suffrage half a century before India even became free of the shackles of colonialism.

MTA sexual harassment AD

So I still wonder why the NYT’s put this story on it’s cover today and that too without even mentioning the efforts made by it’s own Mass Transit Authorities to ensure a peaceful commute to ladies. The ‘white man’s burden’ was what the British called their efforts to help educate and empower the masses in India. Under this guise of charity work they enacted a subtle and enslaving colonialization. Talking of the distress and oppression of women in India or Afghanistan can also be the perfect PR war cry to ensure independence to Afghanistan and its women. History has proven that women are often used as pawns in some man’s game of power politics.

Which makes me think of Sameena, a woman who plays by her own rules. She is 23 years old, Muslim and divorced her husband because he would beat her. She stands up for what she believes and wears a burkha most of the time. Except for when she sits in the front seat and drives a taxi in Mumbai. A woman that represents great independence and shatters many stereotypes in one drive. You’ll hear more from her soon.

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5 Responses to “Make Way for Women in Trains and Taxis.”

  • Don Briggs Says:

    They follow the same practice of segregating the women in Japan too, but only during peak hours when the trains are jam packed. There is also a big problem with women being fondled in the trains that are so crowded that the conductors on the platforms actually shove people into them. I guess there is a sense of anonymity in these trains that are so full. Even in one of the most “civilized” countries in the world this problem exists.

    Your take on the story seems a bit hyperbolic. I don’t know who the author is (he is listed as Hari Kumar, but who knows what his real name is – the actor Kal Penn comes to mind – real name Kalpen Suresh Modi), but Mr. Kumar has written several other stories from India so I would assume that he is a regular correspondent for the Times. As to why they put it on the cover, I might guess that it was because of the photo. If you look at the other stories on the front page, none of them have the compelling visual that the train picture offers. A gifted photographer like yourself should recognize this appeal.

    I really enjoy your blog entries and found the tone of this one to be a bit knee jerk. I could say more, but perhaps this is a blog entry that would have benefited from a day of reflection.

  • Don Briggw Says:

    I am sorry for making my comments on your previous post. I think I might be a bit sensitive to a perception of US bias when there is so much current internal distortion of US domestic political discourse that troubles me so greatly.
    Please don’t make the assumption that I dismiss your observations so cavalierly.

  • admin Says:

    Don, you have a valid point and criticism. Tying US policy into the story is a little way out of a connection but then again I do believe that the US foreign policies come up with great causes like the weapons of Mass destruction etc. to carry out their own vested interests.

    Yes women all over the World face harassment, Indian women more so because of the history of social traditions I mentioned. The author, Hari Kumar has done a good job of stating the facts but with little background into the larger issues surrounding the status of women in India. And that’s something which should not be overlooked in a story of this nature I feel.

    Yes the images in the NYT’s story are great and thanks I’m taking your comment as a compliment about my own amateur photography. :)

  • D. Karnani Says:

    I guess you Gen X and younger Indian women have not travelled in buses much in Delhi – back in our days (the late 60′s)we used to call them “massage machines”- when you are packed in like sardines – you never know who is going to touch who where – most inappropriately. And if a girl complained, instead of helping, the other passaengers laughed at you or smirked. Not much has changed in 40 years – ask your mom about her bus rides in her school/college days – I’m sure she will have a few good stories!

  • admin Says:

    I have traveled in Delhi buses though I’ll admit not many times and yes I think all women in Delhi know to some extent of what you talk of.

    I’ll have to ask my mother about her take on all this soon!

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Jul 29 2009

Featured on the radio show, ‘Masala Canada.’

So it looks like the Taxi Takes on Terror is gaining speed :)
Wojtek Gwiazda interviewed me for his show, ‘Masala Canada.’

MASALA CANADA is an eclectic mix of stories, conversations and music with a South Asian flavour. Hosted and produced by Wojtek Gwiazda, this weekly radio program deals with everything from art and culture, to economics, politics and everyday life.
They featured three short stories on this weeks show. After my bit there is singer songwriter Shabani Kashyap who I actually met once before. When I was a student at MCRC Jamia my friend Pahuna did her studio based program on Shabani Kashyap. Pahuna had asked me for a favor. So I drove to Shabani’s place, and played chauffeur and picked up the famous singer in my friend’s aunt’s expensive luxury car.
So the road to the ‘Masala Canada’ show has been an interesting one. There are no coincidences.
You can hear the show here or by clicking on the image above.

Recently I was at the SAJA (South Asian Journalists Convention) at the CUNY school of Journalism in New York City.
There was an afternoon plenary session focusing on covering the 26/11 Mumbai attacks with a great panel which consisted of Dan Harris, who covered 26/11 for ABC news; Indira Kannan, the US bureau chief for CNBC – TV18 and CNN- IBN in India and Samanth Subramanian, staff writer with Mint, the Hindustan Times -Wall Street Journal business daily and an alum of Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. The Moderator was Kiran Khalid, director of ‘We are Not Free’ and currently at ABC’s Good Morning America.

I decided to share my own ‘take’ and work around the 26/11 terrorist attacks at the plenary and Wojtek must have found something interesting about the project and walked back up to where I was sitting and slipped me his business card. It was a pleasure to be on radio talking to him and getting to talk about my experience of filming and working with the Mumbai taxi drivers on Masala Canada.

MASALA CANADA is heard on shortwave and the Internet throughout India, South Asia and the world. In Canada, it’s heard on the Internet, and on Sirius Satellite Radio Channel 95.
Hope you like the interview. Do spread the word!

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Jul 25 2009

The scars of Leopold.

It seemed to be business as usual. The business of selling cheap drinks and delicious snacks to one and all in Colaba causeway. And few can do it better than Leopold Cafe, the iconic restaurant and bar in Bombay that throngs with foreigners, office folk, rock and roll teenagers and anyone else who chooses to walk in. I walked right in.

The street oustide Leopold Cafe.

The street oustide Leopold Cafe.

On the 26th of November two young terrorists opened fire on the laid back folk. It was a Wednesday and the place was packed with people taking a mid week respite. When I approached the infamous café I had expected doors or some other form of restriction but was greeted by a man standing next to the streets who sort of smiled and welcomed people in.

In keeping with normality and tradition, I ordered a beer. I looked around in a surreal stupor trying to imagine and visualize the awful panic and stench of terror that must have enveloped Leopold. All I could do was stare and sip. The high ceiling allows a second floor, which is darker, dingier and manages to pack a lot of people who are more than happy to get a seat. I thought of all those people the night of the 26th around 9:30 pm and the person who must have sat on the same seat as me.


I came back to Leopold a second time. And I found myself slipping into the same morbid thoughts amid the din of chattering and clinking of glasses. There was some great art on the walls. One graphic canvas had anti terror slogans, blood, the Gateway of India and other symbols of the attack in November. I started taking pictures of the place around me, maybe as a way of dealing with my being in this space.


There was a helpful man who seemed to work there and it turned out, he was the owner. Farhang Jehani’s father started the Leopold Cafe in 1871 and after his death his son took over. “The attack seemed to last for a few minutes,” he said. After those few minutes he spoke about carrying bodies out of his establishment and staying with his brave staff to wash blood trails off the floors and deal with the police.

Farhang Jehani

Farhang Jehani

At one point he told me he wants to show me something so I followed him to another section of the restaurant. He started shifting furniture around and exposed a part of the black granite floor that had a large crater in it. “This is where the hand grenade fell”, he said. I took a picture, trying to comprehend what the hole in the floor really meant. I recently read about grenades. The United States Army Field manual says, “the effective kill zone has a five meter radius, while the casualty-inducing radius is approximately fifteen meters.” I calculated that I was sitting less than 2 meters from the grenade spot and the streets outside was about 8 meters away.



Farhang had a lot to tell me but a whole lot more to show. He revealed bullet holes in brick walls, shattered glass windows, punctured wooden walls and a hole which looked like it was straight out of the movie ‘Terminator.’ Visuals of the bad cop getting large bullet holes in his body and the molten metal flowing and filling it up filled my mind. The thick metal door that was the way up to the second floor had a two inch scar that had not healed that fast.

As I received the guided tour of the battlefield, I realized that Farhang was showing me these scars like a proud disabled army general shows his medals of bravery. He proudly told me he was not going to fix the walls and floor. Leopold had endured a lot. Leopold had seen much horrors and he was not going to let the World forget but memorialize his beloved family heirloom and stand tall in defiance.

I know many people who have raised their glasses to celebrate many moments in Leopold. Please go ahead and share some of those moments right here. Because in my mind, just as we raise a toast to loved ones, Leopold and it’s scars will always be a memorial and celebration for those who lived life to the fullest.



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2 Responses to “The scars of Leopold.”

  • Anjali Ramachandran Says:

    I like the way you’ve narrated the whole thing – I remember going to Leopolds about 4 years ago and I was awestruck by the aura of the place. I couldn’t believe what happened in November and am glad the place is going strong. Good job on the project Vandana!

  • admin Says:

    Thanks for your comment Anjali.
    Yes, I find Leopold Cafe to be like Mezz (for Delhiites a long time back) or some other local haunt. Everyone has a neighborhood bar or pub they like to visit and chill in. I think Leopold is all that not just for Mumbaikars but to visitors from around the World.

    It’s scary to think of how the people who master mind terrorist attacks choose their targets and victims.

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